Oklahoma FAQ

How is Metrc involved in the lawsuit against OMMA?

On April 15, a vertically integrated marijuana business sued OMMA for, among other things, its ability to require licensees to use seed-to-sale. On April 29, the Okmulgee County judge in the case issued a Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) postponing the April 30 deadline the day before it was set to take effect. While the litigation clearly involves our work with OMMA and licensees, we were not a named party in a legal action that directly affects our company, employees, and services to Oklahomans. To address this, on May 11, Metrc filed a motion to intervene in the case and vacate the TRO. What that means is we are taking the first step to uphold our work with OMMA and licensees. The judge has since granted us permission to intervene.

What does the Temporary Restraining Order (“TRO”) mean?

The plaintiff in the case asked the court to issue a Temporary Restraining Order that would pause OMMA’s April 30 deadline for licensees to start tracking inventory through Metrc. The court agreed to delay the launch of Oklahoma’s seed-to-sale system, which has caused some confusion and uncertainty for everyone involved.

Can I still sign up for Metrc before the June deadline?

Yes, licensees can still sign up for Metrc. The system is live and operational, and Metrc is continuing to offer training and credentialing through June 30. Licensees that complete training can begin tracking inventory through Metrc and become familiar with the system prior to the June 30 deadline.

How do I get training or a demo of Metrc?

Licensees can sign up for our training webinars by clicking the “Sign Up for Training” button at the top of the page.

Can I cancel my Metrc account?

Despite the 60-day extension, Metrc is still the OMMA-awarded provider of the new statewide mandated seed-to-sale tracking system.

What materials do I need to use Metrc?

Metrc’s track-and-trace system relies on two main components: online software and physical tags. Our cloud-based software requires an internet connection and a computer to use it. No additional hardware or software is required.

How much does it cost?

Metrc is $40 per month per license, not per user. This reporting fee covers access to the Metrc platform and ongoing training, support, and maintenance. Additionally, Metrc charges $0.45 per plant tag and $0.25 per wholesale package tag. These costs are designed to be affordable and scale with the size of the business. Since licensees aren’t responsible for printing their own tags, they can focus on their core business and avoid costs such as printing equipment and labor to assemble, test, and input tracking tags. Metrc tags are ready to use for all the unique environmental conditions for marijuana cultivation, manufacturing, and retail.

How does Metrc work?

Metrc is an integrated system that allows for real-time tracking and tracing of marijuana plants and products. Licensees attach unique tags to every plant and wholesale package. These tags use readable text, barcodes, and radio frequency identification (RFID) chips to uniquely identify each plant and package. Users then enter information such as plant or product weight, transfer of custody, and test results in our online software platform. That information is then saved and available online for the licensee and OMMA.

Can I use other software with Metrc?

Yes. Metrc offers an open API that allows other software platforms to integrate into Metrc. This gives licensees the flexibility to use whatever software they choose, such as point of sale, and still have their data automatically report into Metrc.

What POS systems will be available with Metrc?

To see the list of validated third-party integrators, including point of sale (POS) systems, click the “Validated Software Providers” button at the top of this page.

Can other businesses see my inventory information?

No. Licensees will only be able to access their own information through Metrc. They will not be able see any information about any other licensee unless they are doing business with another licensee. An example would be transferring packages, where a receiving business can see the package information and lab results from the shipping business prior to receiving the inventory into their account.